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Article 1 of 3
Home | Categories | Agriculture Please tell us what you think of this article. Tell a friend Print Friendly

Falklands : DEBATE ON GAVIN SHORT’S PORTFOLIO REPORT 29.01.15
Submitted by Falkland Islands News Network (Juanita Brock) 29.01.2015 (Current Article)

Re: MR Speaker, Honourable Members, I would like to thank the Honourable Gavin Short for his lengthy update on the Public Works Department but I’d like to make one request and one observation.

DEBATE ON GAVIN SHORT’S PORTFOLIO REPORT

Re: MR Speaker, Honourable Members, I would like to thank the Honourable Gavin Short for his lengthy update on the Public Works Department but I’d like to make one request and one observation.

The request is: please can we have some signage on the raised walkways on Ross Road by the West Store. When I came into Stanley Monday last, we had a very large cruise ship in and the streets of Stanley were filled with tourists spending lots of money in the shops – I hope. But travelling up and down the Front Road – I must have done it up to 5 times during the course of the day – tourists were actively avoiding the raised walkways to cross the road. They were crossing the road everywhere but on the raised walkways. They stopped. They looked at them, moved left or right a few yards and crossed the road. So please can we have some signage – something to say, “Please cross here.” Or something similar or even as they have in the town of Royal Wooten Bassett, black bricks in line so it looks like a zebra crossing. So please can we have something to indicate they are crossings.

The observation is that I am delighted that we have the graders on West Falkland and they are actually doing quite a good job. We have some very skilled operators out there driving the graders but their work is limited by the fact that the roads – the tracks have long since lost the capping and frankly, in some places, there is absolutely nothing to grade. And we really must concentrate on putting a bit more effort into our Camp Tracks and maintaining our Camp Tracks if we are to keep them. It is such a shame to waste so much money in building them only to see them go to waste in a few years.

And to add to Gavin’s gloom and doom regarding the labour force, I was told only last evening that one of those skilled operators we have on the West – they, too, are leaving to join the private sector. This is a great shame and a great miff to Government.

Thank you Mr Speaker.

GS: I would like to thank the Honourable member for his questions and observations. I believe the signage is being looked at and is probably underway. I actually found myself stopped on top of one of the walkways while the tourists walked in front of me so I agree. I am not sure whether we can change the habits of tourists but we will put the signs up. I think the only way you are going to stop them is put railings outside the West Store which will force people to use them. I don’t know whether we want to go that far.

I certainly would take issue with your observation about our grader crews only doing quite a good job. They are doing a wonderful job.

I agree that basically we are down to bedrock or foundations in many places on the road system. If, perhaps as Chairman of the Budget Select Committee on which you sit you would like to propose we could have even more money, I am sure we could do something to make things happen quicker on the West. I agree and am thankful for the money we have had – the extra money to try and stop us going backwards. It has helped and we are going backwards just slightly slower than we were. But I am quite cognisant of the fact that you would have to spend a huge amount of money on those roads just to hold the line.

Thank you.

PR: Mr Speaker, I would like to thank the Honourable Gavin Short for his report. Again, looking at his section on highways, I would just like to feed back that the residents of the North Camp that I have spoken to are really very pleased at the progress in the improvements made in that area. We remember going out in August to a public meeting at Hope Cottage where we were in fear of not only getting bogged on the road but certainly our undercarriages were scraping along on the track. so I am confident from the work that has been carried out by PWD that it won’t happen again this winter and it will make life much easier for the residents of that area to bring in stock to the abattoir, etc., so I would like to pass on thanks from the residents of the North Camp and we look forward to seeing further works of that quality carrying on, on other roads.

I just had two questions coming closer to home for Stanley residents, there was a lot of angst over Christmas over the misuse of the Cape Pembroke area, which is a national nature reserve. An awful lot of mud tracking was going on in that area. People have many points of view about this – how that could be controlled but we certainly did approve funding for a track to go to the Lighthouse in the Budget Select Committee last year. I understand that planning permission has now been given for that track so I would ask the Honourable Gavin Short if he could let us know – particularly for the public – when the track for the Cape Pembroke Light House will go out to tender. I believe it is for the private sector to undertake so I would be grateful for a timeline on that because in my view I think that would help a great deal to alleviate the misuse of that area.

The second was, even going out to Camp, I have been asked about the MPA Road. People that live on Islands are asking me about it. When are we going to start to do something more long-term with the MPA Road and could the Honourable Gavin Short let us know when we are going to put out the contract for a consultant to address the MPA Road and how we might, in the longer term, improve the surface. Again, we would like to know the timing of that – of when that consultancy is going to go out.

Thank you Mr Speaker.

GS: Mr Speaker, I thank the Honourable Member for her observations and questions. Having an awful short-term memory, I will go straight to the last one first. I can’t tell this house when we will be going out for consultancy work I will have to consult and we can disseminate the answer to whoever wants to know.

I have a piece of paper which deals with one of your questions about the road down to Cape Pembroke. You are right. We have planning permission now but we have to firm up on the costs as a closer look at this has highlighted that the original paper has suggested a phased approach with phase 1 being done this year and there is currently, only lately, to only be enough funding for this phase 1 work. So I think there will be a slight delay while we look and check costs again. I will have to come back to you on that as well. Sorry I couldn’t give you the clear answer I hoped I could.

I would like to thank you for your kind words about the work done on the North Camp Road. When you get sections of road like that, it’s no good just slapping a bit of capping over it as a lot of people seemed to suggest because it’s actually the base of the beast that is rotten. You got to root it out and start again or find some way of actually building over top of it, which is what we are doing out on the North Arm section. We are actually laying matting and covering on top of the original base and putting a new base on top of that, then capping on top of that, which then should make the road fit for purpose and be able to take the weight of traffic ir is being subjected to at the moment.
That road was never built for what is being thrown at it. It isn’t a question of just throwing a bit of capping on it to make it ok. If we are going to do this, lets chuck some money at it and do it properly. Do a long-term job.

PR: Mr Speaker, I would like to thank the Honourable Gavin Short for his answers and I look forward to definitive time lines for those two projects. Thank you.

 

This article is the Property and Copyright of Falkland Islands News Network.


Article 2 of 3
Home | Categories | Agriculture Please tell us what you think of this article. Tell a friend Print Friendly

St Helena : LANDSCAPE & ECOLOGY MITIGATION PROGRAMME PROGRESSING WELL (LEMP)
Submitted by Saint Helena Herald (Public Relations Information Office) 04.11.2014 (Current Article)

The Landscape & Ecology Mitigation Programme (LEMP), part of St Helena Government’s Airport Project, is progressing well, with new staff recruitments, facilities and plants.

LANDSCAPE & ECOLOGY MITIGATION PROGRAMME PROGRESSING WELL (LEMP)


The Landscape & Ecology Mitigation Programme (LEMP), part of St Helena Government’s Airport Project, is progressing well, with new staff recruitments, facilities and plants.

Amongst its many areas of work, the LEMP team is tasked with regenerating all temporarily disturbed ground caused by the construction of the Airport, in conjunction with Basil Read, and with providing compensatory habitat for all lands permanently lost.

There are now 8 people directly employed on Island by the LEMP carrying out ecological surveys, collecting seeds from the wild, growing plants, and carrying out habitat restoration activities throughout the Airport Development Area. The LEMP is also partnered by AECOM, a UK based consultancy which has been involved with the Airport Project for several years. AECOM is currently creating draft landscape designs which will be assessed by LEMP staff and public stakeholders and refined during an on-Island visit by staff later this month.

To be able to grow the tens of thousands of plants required, the LEMP has reinvigorated the old training centre below the Rock Club in Half Tree Hollow into the LEMP Tree Nursery where the majority of plants will be grown.

LEMP Project Manager, Ross Towers, explains:

“There has been weeks of hard work put in to remove several years’ worth of weed growth, to repair derelict buildings, and to kit the facility out to be able to produce the plants we will need over the next few years. The team has worked very hard to get the place up to scratch.”

Species currently being grown for conservation rehabilitation efforts include native and endemic species such as samphire, ebony, scrubwood and fishbone grass. There are also plants for residential areas such as flamboyant for Rupert’s Valley being grown. Residents from Rupert’s, Deadwood and Bottom Woods are being asked whether there are any particular plants they would like to see in their district.

For more information on the LEMP or to pass on your ideas, contact Ross Towers, LEMP Project Manager, on 22721 at the Air Access Office, Second Floor Post Office, Jamestown, or by email: ross-towers@sainthelena.gov.sh.

SHG
4 November 2014

 

This article is the Property and Copyright of Saint Helena Herald.


Article 3 of 3
Home | Categories | Agriculture Please tell us what you think of this article. Tell a friend Print Friendly

Tristan : Tristan da Cunha: The Way Tristanians Tell It
Submitted by Tristan Times (Juanita Brock) 07.01.2004 (Current Article)

Daniel Schreier and Karen Lavarello-Schreier have written an informative book about Tristan da Cunha, its people, way of life and language.

TRISTAN da CUNHA: THE WAY TRISTANIANS TELL IT

By J. Brock (SARTMA)

 

The Cover of Daniel and Karen's book

Daniel Schreier and Karen Lavarello-Schreier have written an informative book about Tristan da Cunha, its people, way of life and language. Entitled "Tristan da Cunha: History, People, language," it has a forward by James Glass, the former Chief Islander and preface and acknowledgements by the authors. What makes this book unique is that it has an Islander as a co-author. Normally, outsiders, who have a keen interest and knowledge of the Island, author books about Tristan da Cunha.

This well-written book, published by Battlebridge Publications, details briefly a concise history of the Island from its discovery in 1506 by the Portuguese navigator, Tristao da Cunha, to its modern day events, including the 21 May 2001 hurricane that devastated the Island. Many black and white photos depict the Tristan of today, its people and life, as well as leisure activities. Newer photos show the damage the 2001 hurricane did to the Island’s infrastructure.

A Tristan Glossary completely details the Island’s unique interpretation of English and traces its words and phrases back to the original countries or origin. Afrikaans, Americanisms, dialectal English and uniquely Tristanian words are explained in the glossary.

Proceeds from the book are going to the Tristan Disaster Appeal. Details on how to obtain a copy of this book can be found on the website: http://www.battlebridge.com.

 

 

This article is the Property and Copyright of Tristan Times.

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